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Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a benign soft tissue (synovial membrane) tumor that rarely involves the hands or wrists. And Tendon impairment caused by GCTTS is extremely rare Abstract Background: Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a benign soft tissue (synovial membrane) tumor that rarely involves the hands or wrists. And Tendon impairment caused by GCTTS is extremely rare GCTTS is the second most common soft tissue tumor of the hand after ganglion cysts [ 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ]. It occurs at any age with peak incidences in the third to fourth decades; women are mostly affected [ 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 ]. The tumor usually appears as a painless, slowly growing mass on the volar surface of the fingers [ 1, 3, 4, 6 ] A total of 35 patients were identified: GCTTS (n=8), TGCT (n=1), and PVNS (n=26), there were 18 men and 17 women. The median age was 48 years (range 6-84 years). The most common site of involvement was the knee (15), followed by wrist (7), elbow (4), and hip (4) They have previously been known as giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), pigmented villonodular tumor of the tendon sheath (PVNTS), extra-articular pigmented villonodular tumor of the tendon sheath or localized or focal nodular synovitis 11

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath in the wrist that

GCTTS is a proliferative disorder of tendon sheaths that is the second most common cause of a mass of the hand and wrist They have previously been known as giant cell tumours of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), pigmented villonodular tumour of the tendon sheath (PVNTS), extra-articular pigmented villonodular tumour of the tendon sheath or localised or focal nodular synovitis 11

A Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) is a benign tumor consisting of many types of polygonal cells in a bed of collagen. It involves the joint fluid sac, tendon sheath, and synovial membrane of the joints. Synovial fluid is the lubricating fluid found in the joints (like knee, elbow), and synovium refers to the thin membrane that lines. Summary Typically, a lump on the wrist is not a cause for concern. The lump can result from various underlying conditions, such as RA or a ganglion cyst, epidermal inclusion cyst, GCTTS, or carpal.. A ganglion cyst is a non-cancerous (benign) lump that occurs around joints. They commonly develop on the back of the wrist or on the hand, and are often round or oval-shaped. Ganglion cysts grow..

Background: Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) are the second most common benign tumor of the hand, behind ganglions. Clinically, GCTTS most commonly present as a slow-growing, firm, non-tender mass on the digits. GCTTS are known to occur in the wrist and proximal hand, but these are uncommon Aims/Background —Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is regarded as the most common neoplasm of the hand that can recur after excision. The objective of this study was to review a series of cases in our department and to determine any clinical or pathological features that might predict the likelihood of recurrence Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) commonly presents as a slow-growing and painless soft-tissue lesion in the hand. It has a propensity to mimick other benign and malignant lesions of the hand including lipoma, haemangioma, myxoid cyst, synovial sarcoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, fibroma and osteosarcoma. GCTTS has a unique histopathological appearance that aids in definitive diagnosis With respect to the 7 D-GCTTS patients, the tumors were located in the ankle and foot (6 cases) or the hand and wrist (1 cases). All 7 lesions presented as an aggressive soft tissue mass infiltrating the tendon sheath and adipose tissue around the joint Rare GCTTS can cause extrinsic compression of major nerves. Case Descriptions The first patient was a 36-year-old man with a left wrist mass associated with pain and paresthesia in the radial three digits. On ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the mass appeared arising from the left median nerve with a picture suggestive of an.

The L-GCTTS group included 10 males and 21 females with a mean age of 37 years and a range between 16 and 65 years. Of the 31 patients with L-GCTTS, 18 of the tumors were located in the hand and wrist, 10 in the ankle and foot, 2 in the knee joint and 1 in the temporomandibular joint We report a case of a histopathologically confirmed giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) arising from the tendon of the wrist. Jaffe et al. first described GCTTS in 1941. They claimed that this lesion had a histological origin in common with pigmented villonodular synovitis; the major difference being that GCTTS grows outward from the. Wrist occurrence is relatively rare. A previous study described 19 cases of GCTTS, of which one occurred in the wrist. 8 Another published study reported 14 cases of GCTTS, of which one case occurred in the wrist. 9 Neoplastic cells account for less than 16% of total cells, and a frequent chromosomal translocation [t(1:2)(p13;q37)]. After ganglia, GCTTS is the most common mass affecting the hand and wrist . GCTTS represents a localized extra-articular form of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) related to a tendon sheath. The peak age is the third to fifth decades. GCTTS is located in the hand and wrist in 65-89% of lesions. In the hand the volar aspects of the first three digits are most commonly affected. 6 8-10 Patients usually present with a painless soft tissue mass. The mass may be slowly growing or be static for many years

hand and wrist. Giant cell tumours of the tendon sheath tend to be slow growing and usually appear as a non-painful lump. A giant cell tumour of tendon sheath can occur at any age, but is most common in adults and is more commonly found in women. Diagnosis We will confirm your diagnosis once we have carried ou GCCTS are the second most common lesions of the hand and wrist. These present as slow growing, firm, nontender mass with a predilection for the radial three digits especially around the distal interphalangeal joint . In a study by Capelastegui et al., GCTTS was the most frequent specific diagnosis . These show characteristic imaging features.

GCTTS is located in the hand and wrist in 65-89% of lesions. In the hand the volar aspects of the first three digits are most commonly aVected.6 8-10 Patients usually present with a painless soft tissue mass. The mass may be slowly growing or be static for many years.Th The most common lesions with tropism for the hand and wrist. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is the second most common tumor after synovial cysts in the hand. GCTTS is an extra-articular form of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) Ganglion cysts are considered the most likely suspect, representing about 50% of all abnormal hand and wrist growths. 1  Ganglion cysts are caused when the lining of the small joints forms a small pouch into which fluids leach and accumulate Ganglion represents the most common cause of mass in the wrist area. Ganglion may form due to chronic irritation and degeneration of tendon sheath or may arise from a joint. Thus, it is located near the tendon sheath or joint. Most commonly it occurs in dorsum of the wrist from the scapholunate joint

Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), may help reduce wrist pain. Stronger pain relievers are available by prescription Presentation of case We describe the case of a DRUJ dislocation caused by giant cell tumour of tendon sheath (GCTTS) in wrist. At surgery, the stabilization of DRUJ was constructed by using mini-plate-button after removal of intraoperative removal of the tumor. Postoperative plain films showed good position, and no obvious dislocation was found Ganglion cyst The most common mass in a wrist or hand is a ganglion cyst. A ganglion cyst is a non-cancerous lump that may occur around a joint or the lining of a tendon. They are fluid filled and may feel spongy or very firm

A giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is 1 of the most common soft-tissue tumors of the hand and wrist, while the 2nd most frequent site is the ankle-foot complex. Although various solid tumors can develop in the axilla, GCTTS has not yet been reported Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a rare condition with an incidence reported at 0.5% [5]. It is the second most common soft tissue tumour of the hand and wrist, after synovial ganglion, occurring predominantly in females. Localisation to the hand and wrist is noted in about 70% of cases, with a propensity for the radial thre nosed histologically with GCTTS distal to the wrist joint, treated by the same surgeon and followed for at least 3 years, were retrieved from a prospectively enrolled data-base and analyzed retrospectively. Records of 50 patients were retrieved (34 female and 16 male) from the database. Each hand soft tissue tumor registry was created using GCTTS is rare entity, which occurs most frequently about the hand and wrist, but uncommonly at the foot and ankle. Ultrasound (US) examination with Doppler imaging allows rapid, direct evaluation of masses about the foot and ankle to determine if they are solid, allowing exclusion of ganglion cysts and distended bursa

Although GCTTS most commonly presents in a digit of the hand, it may also present in the palm, wrist, foot, knee, ankle, elbow, and hip., The reported local recurrence of GCTTS after excision is up to 45%., Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology helps in making an early, accurate preoperative pathological diagnosis., Wrist 1 5 6 Elbow 1 0 1 Clinical Findings Of the 207 patients, 67 were men and 140 were women; there was a 1 :2 predominance of females. The ages of the patients at the initial surgical procedure ranged from 4 to GCTTS of the large joint group removed from the knee joint Although GCTTS most commonly presents in a digit of the hand, it may also present in the palm, wrist, foot, knee, ankle, elbow, or hip. Here, we present a rare case of GCTTS originating at the inguinal region, which has not been previously reported. A 52-year-old male presented with a 2 cm × 1 cm swelling at the right inguinal region GCTTS is the most common soft-tissue tumor of the hand and wrist and mainly affects the volar aspect of the distal fingers. It presents clinically as an indolent, slowly growing nodular firm mass. It presents clinically as an indolent, slowly growing nodular firm mass

Ganglion represents the most common cause of mass in the wrist area. Ganglion may form due to chronic irritation and degeneration of tendon sheath or may arise from a joint. Thus, it is located near the tendon sheath or joint. Most commonly it occurs in dorsum of the wrist from the scapholunate joint A 32-year-old man suffered sharp trauma to the volar aspect of the wrist. A lacerated tendon found on exploration had been left unrepaired and the skin closed primarily. A few months later the patient presented with a nodule at the same site. Reoperation demonstrated a 2 X 1 cm nodule bridging the gap between the stumps of the previously. Soft-tissue masses located at the hand and wrist are a frequent clinical presentation. The majority of these are ganglia, which have characteristic imaging features. Other common masses in which a diagnosis is suggested by imaging include hemangiomas, lipomas, and focal synovitis. The remainder are rare although a diagnosis may be attempted by considering the patients' age and the location A giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is 1 of the most common soft-tissue tumors of the hand and wrist, while the 2nd most frequent site is the ankle-foot complex. Although various solid tumors can develop in the axilla, GCTTS has not yet been reported. We describe the sonographic appearance of GCTTS in the axilla

  1. ation. Of the 31 patients with L-GCTTS, the tumors were located in the hand and wrist (18 patients), the ankle and foot (10 cases), the knee joint (2 cases) and the temporomandibular joint (1 case). Al
  2. Most common in patients after 30 years old and it is the second most common benign hand tumor after a ganglion cyst. GCTTS present as localized or diffuse proliferation of synovial-like cells, giant cells, inflammatory cells and xanthoma cells along tendon sheaths. Must be differentiated from diffuse tenosynovial giant cell tumor
  3. GCTTS mostly affects tendon sheaths and finger joints; however, its presence in the wrist and Guyon canal is scarcely reported. CasePresentation: In this report, we describe the case of a 32-year-old female with signs and symptoms of ulnar tunnel syndrom

Introduction. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) is the second most common tumor of the hand, typically presenting in the third to fourth decade of life ().Also known as localized nodular tenosynovitis, GCTTS is characterized by diffuse presence of multinucleated giant cells and proliferation of synovial-like cells ().This benign lesion is predominantly found in the hand, followed by. Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) of the tendon sheath is a benign synovial tumor of unknown etiology and is a rare entity. It is considered to be a form of focal pigmented villonodular proliferative synovitis and has similar histological findings

In the wrist and hand, most cases of pig-mented villonodular synovitis, a rare prolif-erative disorder of uncertain cause that affects the synovium [21], present in the nodular form, also known as giant cell tumor of the tendons sheath (GCTTS). GCTTS is the most common soft-tissue tumor of the han erature. No definite and radical method is available for the treatment of GCTTS. This report describes an unusual case of a 22-year-old woman who previously experienced a GCTTS in her right elbow, which was removed 10 years earlier. Currently, she presented with an enlarged painless right wrist mass with focal swelling Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a common neoplasm, frequentlydeveloped around small digital joints of hand, and less commonly in wrist, ankle, footand knee. GCTTS of other locations are very rare. The cytological feature of GCTTS isunique, but it could mimic neoplasm, inflammation or other lesions when arising inunusual locations Morphologically, localized nodular type (type I) of the GCTTS is systematically benign and more common in digits and wrist, 5 whereas a diffuse type (type II) is more aggressive and destructive, and occurs often at larger joints, such as the knee, hip, ankle, and elbow. 6 In the clinic, GCTTS was found to occur in the fingers in 85% of cases and in large joints such as the knee and ankle in 12.

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath in the hand: analysis of

GCTTS was initially regarded as an inflammatory disease; however, the finding of aneuploidy in certain cases and the demonstration of clone chromosomal abnormalities strongly support a neoplastic origin .GCTTS occurs in the age group of 30-50 years and with a female preponderance. Hand is more frequently involved followed by knee, ankle, wrist. A little of fluid was shown in 6 cases. CONCLUSION: X-ray can demonstrate the lesion and erosion of bone, destruction of bone can clearly be shown on CT. The low intensity signal on MRI T1WI and T2WI is the characteristic appearance of GCTTS. And it can clearly show the lesion range and type of GCTTS. PMID: 19146160 [Indexed for MEDLINE However, GCTTS in large joints such as the knee and wrist tended towards mold shape and homogeneous signals. Kappa values for the intra- and inter-observer agreements were lowest for PDWI sequences with low signal patterns, but were nonetheless 0.879 wrist and hand are benign [1, 2]. In practice, the most common lesions encountered are ganglia. The most frequently seen solid masses include giant cell tumours of tendon sheath (GCTTS), lipomas, Dupuytrens con-tractures, nerve sheath tumours, glomus tumours, haemangioma/vascular malformations and synovial pathology

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath, tenosynovial giant cell

Giant-Cell Tumors of the Tendon Sheath. Giant-cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) are the next most common soft tissue tumors of the upper extremity, after ganglions. These benign tumors are known by a number of different names, including fibrous xanthoma, localized nodular tenosynovitis, and benign synovioma Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a benign nodular tumor that has become increasingly frequent in the foot and ankle. 1-3 This tumor especially affects the small joints in the extremities and usually presents as a solitary soft-tissue mass; however, simultaneous multi-fragmented lesions in the foot have been reported as an uncommon presentation. 4,5 It can be seen at any age but. The vast majority of soft tissue mass lesions of the wrist and hand are benign [1, 2]. In practice, the most common lesions encountered are ganglia. The most frequently seen solid masses include giant cell tumours of tendon sheath (GCTTS), lipomas, Dupuytren's contractures, nerve sheath tumours, glomus tumours, haemangioma/vascular malformations and synovial pathology Results: Ganglion cysts were the most common tumor type, constituting 25% (n=30) of the tumors, followed by giant-cell tumors of tendon sheath (GCTTS) and lipomas with rates 13% (n=16), and 12% (n=15), respectively. Among these patients, the most frequently requested radiological methods were MRI in 84% (n=69), USG in 13.4%, and CT in 2.4% 2 Ganglion Cyst - Common at wrist, esp. dorsal-May simulate mass, or may be occult source of pain if small or deep - Joint >> tendon sheath-MRI: -Lobulated-Fluid signal-Rim-enhancement-May indicate underlying ligament tearGanglia: Common Locations • Dorsa

Tenosynovial giant cell tumor Radiology Reference

Figure 3. (a) Giant cell tumours of tendon sheath (GCTTS) of index finger. Axial T1 weighted image demonstrating a welldefined intermediate/low signal mass (arrow) adjacent to the flexor tendon (arrowhead). (b) Axial T2 weighted image demonstrating a low signal mass indicating the presence of haemosiderin, surrounded by a rim of high signal (arrowheads). - MRI of soft tissue masses of the. Primary Synovial Chondromatosis in the Wrist with secondary osteoarthritis: AP radiograph (13a), coronal fat suppressed T2 weighted (13b), coronal T1 weighted (13c), and axial fat suppressed T2 weighted (13d, 13e) sequences of the wrist demonstrate multiple generally uniform in size intra-articular bodies, the majority of which demonstrate a. It is a benign proliferative lesion features that are useful in differentiating GCTTS from of synovial origin that occurs most commonly in the hand malignant diagnoses, such as extraskeletal osteosarcoma 123 Volume 471, Number 3, March 2013 A 51-year-old Man with a Wrist Mass 731 and synovial sarcoma, include the appearance of a well. in hand proximal to the distal wrist crease. Demographic parameters of the patients were demonstrated in Table 1. The identified benign tumors were glomus tumors, epidermal cysts, giant cell tumors of the tendon sheaths (GCTTS), pyogenic granulomas, neurinomas, schwan-nomas, lipomas, cystic hygromas, hemangiomas, arterio Focal hand lesions are commonly encountered in clinical practice and are often benign. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the imaging modality of choice in evaluating these lesions as it can accurately determine the nature of the lesion, enhancement pattern and exact location in relation to surrounding tissues. However, while MR features of various soft tissue lesions in the hand have been.

60 Giant Cell Tumor of the Tendon Sheath Radiology Ke

  1. In this article only tumors with specific tropism for the hand and wrist were considered, irrespective of their incidence (Table 2) [1]. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is the second most common tumor after synovial cysts in the hand [4—6]
  2. The knee, followed by the hip, is the most common location for PVNS or PVNB, whereas PVNTS occurs most often in the hand and foot. PVNTS is also referred to as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS). PVNTS is the most common form of this disease by a ratio of approximately 3:1
  3. sequence, GCTTS usually demonstrates susceptibility arte-facts, which are absent in FTS. Bony scalloping is also often seen in GCTTS but rare in FTS, and while both are most commonly located in the hand, GCTTS is more likely to be found in the feet compared to FTS [9]. Focal nodular synovitis Focal nodular synovitis is a benign synovial.

Tenosynovial giant cell tumour Radiology Reference

  1. With regard to the solid tumors, palmar fibromatosis, giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), and peripheral nerve sheath tumor tend to occur in wrist or hand, while plantar fibromatosis, peripheral nerve sheath tumor and Morton neuroma have tendency of occurrence in ankle or foot region [22]
  2. ance. It occurred in tendons and tendon sheaths of the fingers (49%), hands (21%), and wrist (12%). Symptoms were present from 1 week to 6 years (median 5 months).10/138 recurred once and 3/138 recurred twice
  3. like the wrist, ankle, foot, knee, elbow, or hip. Localized TGCT usually is limited to one part of a single joint, but it can limit movement of the joint affected (called range of motion) and damage nearby tissues. What should I expect? Surgery, either open or arthroscopic,† is usually recommended to treat localized TGCT. In many people
  4. Thieme E-Books & E-Journals. Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injur
  5. ance is noted with a 2:1 female-to-male ratio [].GCTTS may arise in any synovial sheath. Less commonly, they can arise from synovial lining of a joint or bursa [].It has a predilection for the synovium of the tendon sheaths of the hands, particularly the volar surfaces.
  6. For GCTTS, imaging techniques scored 50% in sensitivity and close to 90% in specificity. For MRI, which was the most frequently used imaging modality in this population, the sensitivity and specificity were both 100% for ganglion cysts. clinical diagnosis was found to match the accuracy of USG in diagnosing hand and wrist tumors, although.
Approach to Hand ConditionsFigure 5 from MRI of soft tissue masses of the hand and

Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS

  1. The wrist is a complex structure comprised of various types of tissue. Consequently, a presenting mass can have an extensive differential diagnosis. However, only few benign lesions encompass the majority, including ganglion cysts, giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath (GCTTS), and hemangiomas. 1 Other less frequently encountered lesions include lipomas, neural sheath tumors such as.
  2. Many lesions in the hand and wrist present as a painless swelling, and because of the complexity of the hand and wrist structures, the differential diagnosis is extensive (Table III). The vast majority of these lesions are benign and many have distinctive radiological and clinical appearances. It is a known fact that GCTTS i
  3. GCTTS most commonly occurs in the flexor tendon sheath of the hand and wrist, in the volar aspect of the first three fingers, followed by the ankle and foot region. Findings and procedure details - Pathophysiology of the giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is an uncommon an

Lump on wrist: Causes, diagnosis, treatment, and mor

A giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a soft tissue tumor consisting principally of a proliferation of synovial cells arising from a tendon sheath. GCTTS is the second most common tumor of the hand in general and a majority of GCTTS cases are in patients between 20 and 50 years of age, whereas pediatric cases of GCTTS are uncommon Giant Cell Tumors of the Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) are the most common hand and wrist tumors after the ganglion cysts which may sometimes erupt in the synovium rather than the tendon sheath. Being benign in nature and generally asymptomatic they grow in the soft tissues near the tendon and have a rare to mild recurrence trait (4 t0 40%)

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath in the hand: analysis of

Lumps on Your Wrist or Hand: Causes and Treatmen

CSPS - A Giant Cell Tumor of the Tendon Sheath

  1. Tenosynovial giant cell tumors mainly affect individuals between 25-50 years of age, with a median age of diagnosis of 40. However, these tumors can affect the elderly and younger children as well. There is a slight female preponderance in localized TGCT; however, in diffuse TGCT, there is no sex predilection
  2. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue lesion most commonly found in the flexor aspect of hand and wrist. Being rare in foot and ankle, the unusual presentation of this lesion may sometimes mimic other lesions like lipoma, synovial sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, synovial cyst and ganglion. Hence it is important to include this lesion in differential diagnoses.
  3. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) typically presents as a painless, slow-growing mass that arises from a tendon sheath, most often on the volar aspect of a finger, such as this thumb mass . GCTTS has a mixture of mononuclear stromal cells, multinucleated giant cells , and macrophages, including xanthoma cells
  4. ation revealed right dorsal wrist swelling with mild impaired extensor function of ring and little fingers
  5. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a firm, non-tender, slow growing, benign soft tissue neoplasm. It is the second most common tumour of the hand, with simple ganglion cysts being the most common.1 The most frequent tumour location is the index finger. The etiological factors of GCTTS are not known, although a
  6. Giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a benign soft tissue tumor of the limbs arising from the complex of the tendon sheath and periarticular soft tissues of small joints. It is the second most common benign space occupying lesion in the hand and usually presents as a painless soft tissue mass, which grows slowly in size for many years

Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath (localised nodular

Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath mimicking nodal

Until the World Health Organization reclassified them in 2013, 1, 2 TGCTs were classified according to their site of origin (ie, bone, soft tissue, synovium, or tendon sheath) as giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) or nodular tenosynovitis and diffuse type giant cell tumors or pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). 4 According to the. Giant cell tumours of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) are benign tumors of unknown aetiology arising from the tendon sheath, considered as variant of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). These lesions usually affect the volar aspect of the first three digits [3-5], much less commonly affecting the wrist. Fibroma of the tendon sheath (Fig 8

Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath: Magnetic resonance

Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath | Image | Radiopaedia(a) Lipoma(a) Dupuytren’s contracture

Localized TGCT, also known as GCT-TS, usually affects the hand, wrist, ankle, and/or foot, while diffuse TGCT, also known as PVNS, generally impacts larger joints such as the knee, hip or elbow GCTTS represents the second most common cause of soft tis-sue mass in the wrist, with ganglion being the most common 4,7. The volar aspect is affected approximately twice as often as the dorsal aspect. In addition, differential diagnosis may in-, A ganglion cyst is the most common type of hand tumor. These cysts most often occur at the top of the wrist, the palm side of the wrist, the base of the finger, and on top of the end joint of the finger, near the finger nail. From the outside, they look like bubbles underneath the skin. It is unknown what causes ganglion cysts Extension to subchondral bone is more frequently seen in The marked enhancement is secondary to the presence of giant cell tumor of the bone, which is rarely located in the numerous proliferative capillaries within the collagenous hand and wrist (1-5%) while giant reparative granuloma, stroma of GCTTS [2, 7] METHODS: The medical records of all patients diagnosed to have GCTTS during the period 1994-2001 were reviewed, and follow-up was for three to ten years. RESULTS: The total number of patients was 52, of whom 36 were females, and the mean age was 32.4 years. All the tumours except one were located in the hand and wrist area, with the thumb being. Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT), also known as pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) or giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS), is a group of rare tumors that typically arises from the synovium of joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths. 1-3 They are typically non-malignant neoplasms but can be locally aggressive. 1,4 TGCT encompasses 2 broad subtypes—diffuse and localized—that.